Thursday, May 10, 2018

RT READERS' CONVENTION - I'LL BE THERE!

Come join me and some wonderful authors to the Romantic Times Readers' Convention in Reno, Nevada, on May 15-19. It's going to be a ton of fun.





Friday, March 30, 2018

MATH LIMERICK

Want to give it a go? It's really very clever when you actually translate it into words. Poem is below.




SOLUTION: A dozen, a gross, and a score,
                      plus three times the square root of four,
                         divided by seven,
                         plus five times eleven,
                      equals nine squared and not a bit more.


Wednesday, March 28, 2018

Tuesday, February 27, 2018

MUSINGS ON THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE

So, I found this...




And, it made me think...

Ok. This pin has a smiley face. So, what do the words following really mean? Is it that the smiley face is a mirror of how I should look every day? Or is it that I'm exceptional every day? Or is it that this everyday is exceptional? Or is the everyday smile exceptional? Or is every day made exceptional by smiling? Or are everyday smiles exceptional, so I should smile every day?

OK. Don't ask. This is how my mind works. And I feel like Gandalf in The Hobbit, where he ponders the meaning of "Good Morning" to Bilbo ("What do you mean?" he said. "Do you wish me a good morning, or mean that it is a good morning whether I want it or not; or that you feel good this morning; or that it is a morning to be good on?").

Anyway, if I'm a true stickler for the correct use of the English language, and all its wonderful vagaries, the pin is grammatically wrong. It should be exceptional
every day (separated). Why? It's used as an adverb. The word everyday (together) is an adjective. So we have an adjective defining another adjective, which needs a noun to complete it.

That is why I started with all the Gandalf-like questions. Bottom line...I'm weird.